Roast Beef Style Seitan

December 22, 2015
This seitan is a great base for many recipes calling for seitan. It also tastes good when thinly sliced for sandwiches. You can also chop it up and add it to stir-fries, soups, and stews.


Nut free
No added sugar

Yield: About 2 pounds

For the simmering broth:
6 cups (1.41 l) water
1/2 cup (120 ml) soy sauce or tamari
1/4 cup (60 ml) vegan Worcestershire sauce (No anchovies!)
2 tablespoons (16 g) garlic powder
2 tablespoons (16 g) onion powder
2 tablespoons (4 g) dried parsley
1 teaspoon ground black pepper

For the seitan loaf:
2 cups (288 g) vital wheat gluten flour
1/2 cup (60 g) whole wheat pastry flour
1/4 cup (30 g) nutritional yeast
1 tablespoon (2 g) dried parsley
1 teaspoon ground black pepper
1 cup (235 ml) low-sodium vegetable broth
1/4 cup (60 ml) soy sauce or tamari
2 tablespoons (30 ml) olive oil, optional, or low-sodium vegetable broth
2 tablespoons (17 g) minced garlic

You will also need:

To make the broth: In a large pot with a tightly fitting lid, add all broth ingredients and stir to combine.

To make the seitan loaf: In a mixing bowl, stir together vital wheat gluten, flour, nutritional yeast, parsley, and pepper. In a separate small bowl, mix together broth, soy sauce or tamari, oil, and garlic. Add wet ingredients to dry and knead until a uniform, elastic dough ball is formed. Allow to rest 20 minutes before wrapping. Form the seitan dough into a log shape about 4 inches (10 cm) in diameter. Wrap tightly with cheesecloth, wrapping several times around, and secure with knots on each end.

Place wrapped loaf in broth and bring to boil. Reduce to simmer, cover, and simmer for 2 hours, checking every 20 minutes or so, to make sure the loaf is not stuck to the bottom of the pot and flipping if necessary to make sure all sides get covered and simmered in broth. Remove from heat and allow to cool enough to handle. Carefully remove cheesecloth, and use seitan as desired.

Store, in the broth, in an airtight container, in the refrigerator to keep it moist. It lasts about 2 weeks in the refrigerator, or up to four months in the freezer. 

Excerpted from Going Vegan by Joni Marie Newman and Gerri L. Adams. (Fair Winds Press, 2014)