How to Eat Locally

By Lisa Freedman | Last Updated October 02, 2014

It’s easier than ever to live a local food lifestyle.

To be considered locally or regionally produced, food has to travel less than 400 miles (or stay inside the state in which it originated), according to the definition adopted by the U.S. Congress in the 2008 Farm Act. But to many local-food advocates, that distance is far too great. The 100-mile diet has garnered loads of followers, and many conscientious people try to eat within even smaller geographic constraints. Thanks to more than 8,000 farmers markets across the country, it’s easier than ever to be a legit locavore. Keep reading to get inspired.

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Buy Local! Buy Seasonal!

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